Non Compos Mentis

Ask me anything   About Me   

Not of sound mind. Amy the anomaly. Raptor Jesus.
INFP. Slytherin. Phlegmatic. Type 6: The Loyalist.

incompleteicarus:

Do you ever ‘wtf white people’ even though you are a white people.

(via arguewithatree)

— 5 hours ago with 50722 notes

totallyfubar:

andinstantlyifellinlove:

totallyfubar:

That whole planting the american flag on the moon thing really backfired on us because the sun’s radiation bleached the flag entirely white and now it’s just the french flag planted in the moon which makes no sense

Well, as I always say, VIVE LA REVOLUTION!

Vive la what, I just called the white flag of surrender the French flag, sit down

(via flomation)

— 5 hours ago with 45817 notes

zemets-melody:

viva-la-heichou:

hannahissoweird:

koujakus-boyfriend:

sossidge:

me 11:59 September 30th

image

me 12:00 October 1st

image

it’s not even october and 90% of tumblr is like the second gif

I’ve never seen tumblr on Halloween or Christmas… Is it bad?

image

It’s how i knew i had a Home on Tumblr  ;)

(via novas-grimoire)

— 16 hours ago with 446479 notes

glitterpill:

bymiathermopolis:

thisguyknowswhatimtalkingabout:

Remember when I blindly hated Russel Brand? I fucked up.

"They’re in a better position to judge than I am."

I think this is how most open minded people who value communication, connection, and are willing to learn from others think.

…Did… Did Russel Brand just explain how to react to being called out on something? 

Huh.

(Source: idontcareimjustinspired, via moofinsmoofin)

— 1 day ago with 137592 notes

cocoabutterbabe:

This is an accessory store where everything is $1.

(via agentrodgers)

— 1 day ago with 76031 notes

p-okemonica:

literatenonsense:

exgynocraticgrrl:

Malcolm X: Our History Was Destroyed By Slavery 

on March 17, 1963 in Chicago.

see how little we get taught about history - I never had any idea why Malcolm X used the ‘X’. 

how come i never knew this damn

(via bibliophilicwitch)

— 1 day ago with 122826 notes
cannibalcoalition:

Spiced Pomegranate Wine
You will need:
Pomegranate juice (I used Bolthouse)
wine making yeast (I used Red Star)
sugar or honey
a large jug
a balloon
about three weeks
bottles and corks (for bottling)
a funnel
mulling spices (nutmeg, clove, anise)
THE FIRST THING
Pomegranate juice goes in the saucepan, heat on LOW. Basically, you don’t want it cold.
Pour in sugar or honey to taste. You will want to cut some of the tartness out of the juice because whether it ferments or not it may still end up tasting like vinegar to most people. So make it plenty sweet.
Using a funnel, pour the juice into a gallon jug. Don’t worry if it doesn’t fill it all the way up.
Add 1 package of yeast (or 1 1/4 teaspoon) to the juice. You can use bread yeast if you can’t find wine-maker’s yeast, but it will give it a bready taste to your wine, so you have been warned.
Stretch a balloon over the top of the jug and store it in a temperate, dark place (we do our wine-making in the basement.)
WAIT THREE WEEKS OR SO. As the yeasts interact, the balloon will start to inflate. This is good. You want this. When the balloon starts to sag, shake it up a little and tell the little buggers to wake up and get to work. If the balloon doesn’t inflate again, they’re done. This took about three weeks for me
THE SECOND THING
Pour your wine out into another saucepan, and heat on low again.
Stir in your mulling spices until they dissolve, or use a teaball. Add them to taste.
Once its all dissolved and everything tastes like a kick in a glass, funnel it into bottles, cork them, and store them. Or just drink it right away like the badass winemaker you are.
Give it away as holiday presents, use it for offerings, or just drink the whole thing because you made this wine and you are its god.

cannibalcoalition:

Spiced Pomegranate Wine

You will need:

  • Pomegranate juice (I used Bolthouse)
  • wine making yeast (I used Red Star)
  • sugar or honey
  • a large jug
  • a balloon
  • about three weeks
  • bottles and corks (for bottling)
  • a funnel
  • mulling spices (nutmeg, clove, anise)

THE FIRST THING

  1. Pomegranate juice goes in the saucepan, heat on LOW. Basically, you don’t want it cold.
  2. Pour in sugar or honey to taste. You will want to cut some of the tartness out of the juice because whether it ferments or not it may still end up tasting like vinegar to most people. So make it plenty sweet.
  3. Using a funnel, pour the juice into a gallon jug. Don’t worry if it doesn’t fill it all the way up.
  4. Add 1 package of yeast (or 1 1/4 teaspoon) to the juice. You can use bread yeast if you can’t find wine-maker’s yeast, but it will give it a bready taste to your wine, so you have been warned.
  5. Stretch a balloon over the top of the jug and store it in a temperate, dark place (we do our wine-making in the basement.)
  6. WAIT THREE WEEKS OR SO. As the yeasts interact, the balloon will start to inflate. This is good. You want this. When the balloon starts to sag, shake it up a little and tell the little buggers to wake up and get to work. If the balloon doesn’t inflate again, they’re done. This took about three weeks for me

THE SECOND THING

  1. Pour your wine out into another saucepan, and heat on low again.
  2. Stir in your mulling spices until they dissolve, or use a teaball. Add them to taste.
  3. Once its all dissolved and everything tastes like a kick in a glass, funnel it into bottles, cork them, and store them. Or just drink it right away like the badass winemaker you are.

Give it away as holiday presents, use it for offerings, or just drink the whole thing because you made this wine and you are its god.

(via devoteeofpoppies)

— 1 day ago with 563 notes
#witchy reference  #food reference 
"

i am not the story
you have been told.

i am not pure
nor powerless
i am not your fantasy
of an innocent you can corrupt.

you think he took me?
you think i knew not what i did
when i laughed and placed those crimson seeds
upon my tongue?

do not mistake my kindness
for naievete.
i am forest fires and flower buds
i am poisonous thorns and newborn foals
i am death and rebirth—
cross me at your peril.
(you shall find that pretty rose vines
are just as lovely when they wrap tight over your limbs
and shatter your bones.)

my lord, he brings me wreaths of bloodstained flowers,
and i grant him kisses laced with venom
he gifts me graveyards to plant my orchids
and i send him the torn heads of men
who wrong my maidens.
(i teach them combat alongside botany. both are arts.)
he rules with iron fist and i
with gentle touch.
we live and love in a curious harmony
of sweet birdsong
and the tortured screams of sinners.

come springtide i am bound to earth
to my mother’s sunfilled meadows,
her unequivocal, enduring love.
and by the fading light of summer
i return to my lover’s onyx walls
and cimmerian heart.
i cherish both but they know
they would have no claim on me if i did not desire it
for i belong to myself,
i am only my own—
half blooming creation,
half blazing hellfire.

he calls me his lady
but he knows
i am a queen.

"
persephone speaks, by a.c. (via bellamybleke)

(via devoteeofpoppies)

— 1 day ago with 4314 notes
Witch Respect

fawn-and-fang:

I respect the solitary witches who blaze your own trails, walk your own paths, and listen to your own gods. It can be a lonely, yet rewarding, life. It is not for the faint of heart. From the solitary we can all learn self-reliance and how to listen to our intuition.

I respect the witch who chooses a traditional coven. Whether it is Gardnerian, Alexandrian, reconstructionist, or another group, it requires an intense amount of devotion and time to learn a tradition. You have earned your titles and should be recognized by our community. From the members of groups and covens we can learn patience and determination.

I respect the kitchen witches who fill your homes with magick and tend the hearthfires. With the ancient elements you nourish your family and remind us all of our human history. From the kitchen witch we can all learn how to create magick from the mundane and appreciate the domestic arts.

I respect the hedgewitch who works with the spirits that surround us. It can be exhausting and misunderstood work. You have gifts that can help the living and the dead, and I admire that. From the hedgewitch we can learn how to communicate better and how to see different points of view.

I respect the sea witch who walks along the dunes at night and gathers kelp. The energy of the sea is one of the oldest and most powerful forms of magick, and is recognized in many cultures. From the sea witch we can learn to work in harmony with the elements and listen to the pull of the moon and tides.

I respect the gray witches who do not look at magick in black and white. Within magick, as within life, we are often called upon to use our own judgement in a situation. I do not condemn my fellow witches for not seeing things as I see them. From the gray witch we can learn to examine a situation from many points of view and realize that there are no rules but those we create for ourselves.

I respect witches of all genders and sexual orientation. Each person deserves to feel welcomed and comfortable in our community and does not need any more judgement than they already experience. From these witches we can all learn how to appreciate diversity and to practice tolerance and kindness.

I respect witches who are in tune with their local environment. It is important to learn about the creatures and plants who live near us and you have much knowledge. From these witches we can learn how to look closely at what is around us and how to be aware of the land we live on.

I respect the witches who are new to the craft and starting out. Most are willing to learn from elders and need to be guided by those of us who are older and have more experience. They do not need to be bullied or insulted, for we are all constantly learning. From the new witches we can learn to be teachers instead of judges and should remember the joys and mistakes of our youth.

I respect Christian witches. I support anyone’s personal beliefs. Perhaps we should view these members of the community as bridge builders. With their help we may be able to open doors and cross the divide that has separated the religions. From the Christian witches we can learn that religious tolerance applies to all spiritual paths.

I respect the witches who try to adhere to the paths of your ancestors. It is not easy to do that in the modern era and you are to be treasured. You truly connect the generations and help pass on information that would otherwise be lost. From these witches we can learn to honor our elders and ancestors.

I respect all members of the pagan community who treat others with respect. It is indeed a circle, and each of us is part of the whole.

For all the paths I forgot to mention, I respect them too, and I will probably add to this as the mood strikes me.

Most importantly, respect yourselves.

(via swampseer)

— 1 day ago with 2577 notes